Dump the Scale

Although this might sound a bit extreme, too often people find themselves trapped to the number they see on the scale. For some people, the scale is a means of self-torture. How many times have you stepped on the scale first thing in the morning, and let the number determine how you feel for the rest of the day? In reality, the numbers on the scale don’t mean that much.

Firstly, we have hormones. For women, weight varies throughout the month based solely on hormone levels. Because our hormones change so frequently, it can be quite challenging to get an accurate scale reading.

Secondly, bloating is something that affects both men and women. Although men don’t experience hormonal changes on a monthly basis like women – both sexes can be equally affected by dietary factors. Take for example – sodium. When we ingest high amounts of sodium (in english terms – foods with a high salt content) our body has to try and balance itself with water. In order to dilute high levels of sodium, the body will retain fluids. This is a common cause of bloating and why you might see higher numbers on the scale.

Lastly – and frankly one of the most important points of all – scales tell you nothing about body composition. Muscle is approxmately 18% more dense than fat, so it weighs more. The same weight of muscle can take up half the amount of space as fat. That’s why we can lose inches and change our body shape but see almost no change on the scale. A much simpler way to judge “weight loss”, or more significantly, whether or not you are changing your body, is by how your clothing fits. If you find your jeans are less snug or your t-shirts feel looser then you know you are doing a good job!

Don’t live your life chained to a scale. Our weight naturally changes throughout the course of the day from simply eating and drinking. If you drink more water one day, you might be up 2 pounds. If you sweat a lot when you exercise, you can be down a pound. Focus on exercising and eating right and your body will settle itself to a natural point.