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The Ultimate Guide to Lunch Time Fitness

The Ultimate Guide to Lunch Time Fitness

Fitting in time for a workout throughout the work week isn’t always easy. Instead of hunkering down at your desk for the day, try getting active at lunch. Not only will you feel great about finding time for fitness, you’ll discover yourself re-energized for the rest of the day.

Your 3-step solution to making better New Year’s Resolutions [INFOGRAPHIC]

Your 3-step solution to making better New Year’s Resolutions [INFOGRAPHIC]

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New Year's Resolution Infographic and Statistics // PumpUp Blog

New year, new you? It isn’t easy, but you can achieve your 2015 goals for real. According to one study, 45% of Americans usually make resolutions for the New Year. Given that the U.S. population was just over 317 million at the start of the 2014 year, and that a dismal 8% are reported to successfully achieve their resolutions, this means a whopping 131 million Americans did not achieve their resolutions in 2014. Millions more around the world may have experienced this same failure rate.
Why do so many people make resolutions, while so few succeed? The pre-frontal cortex is an area of the brain responsible for controlling one’s will-power among other important functions, including abstract problem solving and short-term memory.
Asking the pre-frontal cortex to immediately adjust to a big, abstract, and daunting New Year’s resolution is like asking an untrained individual to perform Beyoncé’s choreography perfectly: it won’t work. Like a muscle, the pre-frontal cortex falters easily without proper training.  This means that smaller and attainable goals will be easier to accomplish than larger ones.
If you do these three steps when you’re making a resolution this year, you’ll have a greater chance of being successful.
  • Be specific.  Set tangible goals with concrete deadlines that you can gradually work up to. Rather than making a generalized goal to, for example, run more often this year, train for a race instead.
  • Make a schedule. Take time to create a plan and set mini-benchmarks for yourself. Reward yourself when you transcend tiny personal milestones along the way. Set aside specific days each week for your resolution, or sign up for something that already adheres to a schedule, such as a class. Don’t wait until you ‘have the time’ to work on your resolution.
  • Track your progress. Make gradual changes and don’t expect too much too soon. Patience is everything. Mobile apps such as PumpUp are an excellent way to log your progress while other like-minded people cheer you on. It’s important to have a support team to keep you accountable.

Sources
“New Years Resolution Statistics.” University of Scranton. Journal of Clinical Psychology via Statistic Brain (2014). Web.
“U.S. Population Clock.” United States Census Bureau (2014). Web.
Diamond, Dan. “Just 8% of People Achieve Their New Year’s Resolutions. Here’s How They Do It.” Forbes Magazine (2013). Web.
Lehrer, Jonah. “Blame it on the Brain.” Wall Street Journal (2009). Web.
Webley, Kayla. “Top 10 Commonly Broken New Year’s Resolutions.” TIME Magazine (2012). Web.
Widrich, Leo. “The Science of New Year’s Resolutions.” Buffer Social.(2013). Web.
Vanderkam, Laura. “7 Secrets from People Who Kept Their New Year’s Resolutions” Fast Company (2014). Web.
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Why it's important to have a positive body image

This is a post by PumpUp member sandrafitness. Follow her on Instagram @langencita and follow her blog here

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Today’s the International day of  ”Imma gonna love myself just a bit more” well no, it’s not.

And yet again, why am I doing this? Well… the other day I got through some very scary statistics, and you may be aware of this, but I think it’s veeeery important to spread the word just a bit more.

According to the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders in the U.S:

  • Almost 50% of people with eating disorders meet the criteria for depression.
  • Only 1 in 10 men and women with eating disorders receive treatment. Only 35% of people that receive treatment for eating disorders get treatment at a specialized facility for eating disorders.
  • Up to 24 million people of all ages and genders suffer from an eating disorder (anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorder) in the U.S.
  • Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness.
  • 91% of women surveyed on a college campus had attempted to control their weight through dieting. 22% dieted “often” or “always.”
  • 86% report onset of eating disorder by age 20; 43% report onset between ages of 16 and 20.
  • Anorexia is the third most common chronic illness among adolescents.
  • 95% of all dieters will regain their lost weight within 5 years.
  • 35% of “normal dieters” progress to pathological dieting. Of those, 20-25% progress to partial or full-syndrome eating disorders.
  • The body type portrayed in advertising as the ideal is possessed naturally by only 5% of American females. 

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Scary, right?

Well, right now we have the power to change this. We can just tell someone else that they are just beautiful the way they are. We have the power – and with power comes responsibility- to change this by growing a generation of new girls and boys, who will not attack anyone by their looks. We can see a new generation, where girls won’t be ashamed for gaining a pound, a society where what’s inside will count more than the way you look. You may think it is not possible, but I am telling you it is.

We can’t just blame media, we need to also blame our selves. We are the ones letting this affecting us, and the ones supporting that. But, we are not gonna be able to teach anything valuable if the concept of a positive body image don’t get into our heads first.  And yes, I include myself, we all need to put a little more effort into this to make it happen. First we need to accept and embrace what we are, learn to love it.

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I think I have grown a lot in this sense, but I am not gonna lie, if someone would not like the way I look or would suggest I need to lose some extra pounds. I would surely feel down for some time, and the comment would be stuck in my head.

However, I learnt to fight this by learning to love sport and fitness, not to see it as a punishment. It makes me happy and it really does help with my body perception.

I hope, in a way this was useful to you and that I may have helped one of you.  

xxx

Sandra

This is a post by PumpUp member sandrafitness. Follow her on Instagram @langencita and follow her blog here